There are over 20,000 species of plants that have been recorded as edible, yet in our current society you'll be lucky to find more than 25 of them in your local supermarket!

Edible weeds are a great addition to a healthy, balanced lifestyle. They are local, sustainable, and free so they help cut your food bill. Edible wild plants contain no packaging & no chemicals.

We value your privacy and will never sell, trade or exchange your details with anyone... Period!

This forager has a lot to answer for…

Peru Botanical Trip

You may or may not know that I never intended to teach foraging. Back in 2008 I met a man called Frank Cook.

Frank was extraordinary. Not only as a plant walker, but as a human being too.

Much of what you hear and see regarding plants in the foraging world came from his work. His passion. His fully embodied love of plants, and the relationship we as humans have with them, and they with us.

Frank would travel the world meeting the plants and healers of numerous cultures.

He met them in Africa, Europe, South America, India and Nepal, and by the time of his death in 2009 it was estimated that he had met 70% of the plant genera of this planet. I have to tell you that is extraordinary!

He fed minds and inspired lives, and it was he who kicked me out the door and encouraged me to start teaching foraging. Back then you could count on one hand the number of foraging teachers. Read more…

This divine wild jelly is an absolute must…

Yesterday I told you about Guelder rose (Viburnum opulus), and my desire to make it into a jelly.

Well last night I finished the recipe.

As the jars where cooling down, I wondered whether I would simply end up with a syrup rather than a jelly.

Then this morning when I pottered into the kitchen, it was to my delight that said jelly had not only set, but it was also a delightful pinkish colour. Read more…

Try This Exqusite Guelder Rose Jelly Recipe


This Guelder rose (Viburnum opulus) jelly recipe is quite simply divine. The plant is deciduous, and usually found in hedgerows, scrub and woodlands. It favours damp places and can be found along streams, but it also has the ability to thrive in quite dry spaces too.

Tasting the raw berries (which are mildly toxic if consumed in too great a quantity) will most likely result in much spitting, and verbal exclamations, as it is very bitter… but the bitterness goes when it is prepared into a jelly.

I joke that Guelder rose jelly makes the kitchen stink of old socks during preparation, but that rather off putting image is completely negated once you slather it all over some lovely hot buttered toast, or use it with game and other cooked meats.

So give this Guelder rose jelly recipe a try… I really don’t think you will be disappointed! Read more…

The Wild Super Fruit That Smells Of Old Socks

Viburnum opulus Guelder Rose

I went out yesterday with my beloved on a quest for some lush rose hips. The sun was shining, the breeze cool, church bells ringing out in the distance, and the human world quiet and calm.

It reminded me of when I was a boy. Of how Sunday’s used to feel before the advent of Sunday opening times. Where instead of spending nourishing nurturing time with family and friends, most folk now exist in a 7 day hell of adrenalised work schedules and shallow shopping experiences.

Thank goodness the plants aren’t quite so bonkers!  Read more…

The Awesomeness of Acorns

The awesomeness of acorns

Each morning I go outside and ponder the old oak that stands on the side of the road. Each morning I say a blessing to it.

I’m beginning to shift my understanding of plants, even big plants like trees. No longer seeing them in gender specifics, but sensing into their being that which moves beyond the anthropomorphising of nature, of wildness.  Read more…

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