Acorn Bread & Cow Parsley Oil Dip

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Now that I have some decent acorn bread, I was looking at using some our unwanted weeds to make some interesting dips and I'll come up with more recipes this week but there is already one I absolutely love!!! When you go to a somewhat fancy Italian restaurant, very often you get a simple dip of balsamic vinegar and olive oil. Dip your bread in it and yum! It's super delicious. Oil-based dips themselves can be quite fancy with garlic, spices and minced fresh herbs. I looked at many recipes online and after a couple of trials came up with this super good one using local weeds. Note that again, I'm using chervil / cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris) which can look very similar to poison hemlock. I recognize chervil from hairs on the stems/leaves (poison hemlock does not have any hairs), chervil smells like a mix of cilantro, parsley/carrot tops (poison hemlock smells peppery). The flowers configuration is also different. If you are new to foraging, maybe it's a good idea to skip it and replace it with parsley or simply use other herbs. So this is my simple dip and frankly, just do it with chickweed and it will be awesome. I have tons of miner's lettuce in my yard, I often add them to this mix. 0.2 oz (8 g) savory wild herbs. (chickweed, chervil, garlic mustard, miner's lettuce, perennial pepperweed, etc..), u can mix also some basil, parsley. 3 tablespoons (45 ml) olive oil 1/8 tsp (a bit less than 1 gr) salt 2 minced garlic cloves. 1 tsp (around 2 g) dried Italian herbs, zaatar or Herbes de Provence. 2 teaspoons (10 ml) lemon juice (optional) Mince the garlic cloves, add the savory herbs and mince one more time. You want that garlic to be well minced. Place all the ingredients in a small bowl, stir and place in the fridge for maybe 30 mins so the flavors have the time to mature. YOU ARE DONE! It's that easy. With the lemon juice, it will keep in the fridge for a few days. Without lemon juice, use right away. Here is the problem…you can’t stop eating it and your breath will be super garlicky but, guess what, it's good for social isolation so indulge!

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