EP30: The Edible City – Urban Foraging During Lockdown

John Rensten (author of The Edible City) discusses how to keep foraging in a city during the coronavirus lockdown. How to stay safe, keep your distance and why foraging is vitally important for mental and physical wellbeing.

EP29: Calm Ease

A discussion on foraging, stillness and mindfulness as a way to work with difficult feelings during the coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic. Even if you are a sceptic. Subscribe To The Podcast Apple/iPhone users subscribe on iTunes Android users listen on Stitcher Radio Show Notes Tanya Shadrick: Writer and poet. Thich Nhat Hanh: Calm-Ease. A 20-minute mindfulness practice.

EP28: Introducing Plant Talk

Plant Talk is an occasional supplement to the regular Eatweeds podcast, being the first one I decided to just ‘get it out there’. The quality isn’t up to what I would have liked. Please bear with me while I get to grips with this ‘new technology!’ Also, I would love to hear from you, so leave any questions you might have in the comments below. I’m interested in what you

EP27: Be Your Own Authority – A Forager’s Perspective

I rarely get in front of a camera or speak on podcasts. Yet last month my friend Chris Holland managed to persuade me to sit down with him for a chat. Chris hosts the Talks With Tellers show. A programme where he asks guests to speak about the power of story to reconnect us with the ecosystem. Yours truly (on this occasion) stupidly agreed. Be warned. I don’t mince my

EP26: Herbalism With Attitude

It’s round two with the Seed Sistas. Britain’s most irreverent herbalists. For the past few years, they have been making waves in the plant community. Overthrowing the colonialism that has turned herbalism from something we all used to do, into a profession where you’d think you need a PhD just to touch a plant! Colourful, fun and full of vim (No, not the cleaning product), they discuss: why plant medicine

EP25: Edible Acorns – The Forgotten Food

Acorns are a massive, under-utilised and forgotten food source. Join Robin Harford (your host) and Marcie Mayer (Europe’s foremost acorn food producer), as they explore the edible uses of acorns as a food and in cooking. Listen To This Podcast Subscribe To The Podcast Apple/iPhone users subscribe on iTunes Android users listen on Stitcher Radio Oakmeal Special Offer 1 copy of Marcie Mayer’s Eating Acorns book. 1 bag of freshly cold-processed acorn

EP24: Nutritional Cultural Identity

Masanobu Fukuoka’s one-straw revolution inspired Krishna Mckenzie to start his own organic farm in Auroville, Tamil Nadu, India. In this interview he talks about the importance of nutritional cultural identity, wild food volunteer plants, soil fertility, bioregionalism and why wellbeing needs to be collective not individual self indulgence. Listen To This Podcast Subscribe To The Podcast Apple/iPhone users subscribe on iTunes Android users listen on Stitcher Radio Show Notes Krishna Mckenzie’s Facebook

EP23: Wild Tea Ceremonies & Celebrations

How to create your own local wild tea ceremonies and celebrations for community building and wild wellbeing. In this interview, I talk with my friend Mary Morgaine Squire on how to create local wild tea celebrations to reconnect us to plants, place, self and soil. Listen To This Podcast Subscribe To The Podcast Apple/iPhone users subscribe on iTunes Android users listen on Stitcher Radio Show Notes Herb Mountain Farm Website Herb Mountain

EP22: Foraging The Future, Sustainability & Vital Connection

An interview with Miles Irving, author of the Forager Handbook and creator of The Wild Box, on why we must include humans in our conservation models in order to look after wild spaces. Why foraging is sustainable. How foraging can help feed an ever growing population, and how we can restore our vital connection to Land. Listen To This Podcast Prefer To Read The Interview? Click here Subscribe To The

EP21: From 19th Century Famine Potherb to 21st Century Hipster Food

The edibility of plants has been discussed in old herbals and economic handbooks since the origins of written language. Inventories of wild edible plants were often created in the hope of alleviating famine and finding new sources of food. Nineteenth and early 20th-century ethnography documented the use of wild foods in order to preserve traditions, but the memory of famine always lingered in these sources. In this, Kew’s 19th Annual