Hawthorn Jelly Recipe

This is a lovely, simple hawthorn jelly recipe that you can have with cheese or meats. Make it now and you’ll be in time for giving it away as Christmas presents.

If your celebrating is more earth-centric, then you’ll be in time for the return of the sun on December 21st.

Enjoy this autumnal hawthorn jelly recipe.

Hawthorn Jelly Recipe Instructions

Step 1

Find a nice Hawthorn bush (Crataegus monogyna) laden with lovely red haws.

Step 2

Pick 1.5lbs of hawthorn berries (haws). This will make 1 jar of hawthorn jelly, so obviously if you need more jars, pick more fruit.

Make sure that you remove the stalks. A good way is to simply roll a clump of berries (stalks and all) in between your hands, and you’ll find the haws just roll off. It’s certainly easier than individually pulling off each stalk.

Step 3

Now wash your haws and then drain.

Step 4

Put the haws into a heavy saucepan, and cover with 1.5 pints of water.

Step 5

Bring to the boil and simmer for 1 hour. Mash the berries with a potato masher every 20 minutes.

Step 6

Now strain the mixture over night using some muslin, or as I did, a jelly bag.

To keep the jelly clear do not squeeze the jelly bag, just let the juice drip. If you’re not bothered whether your hawthorn jelly is clear or not then squeeze away.

Step 7

For every 1 pint of juice measure out 1lb of sugar.

Step 8

Now squeeze the juice of 1 lemon.

Step 9

Mix the sugar and lemon juice into a heavy saucepan along with the hawthorn juice. Bring the mixture to the boil, stirring continuously until the sugar has dissolved.

Now rapid boil for 10 minutes until …

Step 10

… the jelly  has reached setting point.

Step 11

Now skim off any foam from the top of the jelly liquid, and pour into sterilised, warm jars and screw on the lids.

Eat at will. There is no need to leave the hawthorn jelly for a month or so.

16 thoughts on “Hawthorn Jelly Recipe

  1. Mr.Hartford- Ive used this Jelly recipe twice now.Thank you.I have a short walk here in Oregon to gather red haws.But have 7 Western Black Hawthornes behind my house.My woman is an herbalist and informed me of the benefits of this tree.We have just harvested 5 lbs that are on the dryer.Tea,syrup and jelly.We would love some advise about the leaves,bark if you have a moment.Thank you again- Byron Arnold

  2. I have been making jelly for years. Purchased a juicer/steamer (you can get them at Fleet farm store) and it takes all the work out of the juicing process. The juice can be capped and stored straight from the steamer for jelly making whenever you have the time. !

  3. Any tips on de-kerneling the hawthornes if you want to keep the fruit pulp? I have been trying different methods but no success, either the force is too strong (like a meat grinder), so it cracks the kernels as well as pushing out the fruit pulp, or to weak like trying to push the fruits against a sieve… I want to use all of the fruit minus the kernel for smoothies etc.

  4. I lived in Windsor, Ont. until 1947. In our neighbourhood
    some people had Hawthorne trees. A few people guarded them vigorously. Thank you, the haws were for their jelly.!

  5. In my experience the fruits are very bitter and the jelly is extremely sharp. I’ve made it several times but it’s almost as sharp as rowan jelly.

  6. I made hawthorn jelly some years ago. It was delicious with a slight tartness and I’m told hawthorn is good for the heart.
    I admit to finding it a tad tedious to prepare though.

    Sadly my local council decided to cut just about every bush and briar, depriving both the birds and myself of hawthorn, elderberry, rosehips and blackberries.

  7. I am so delighted to see this article. In case you haven’t seen it, there is a wonderful book by Bill Vaughn titled Hawthorn: The Tree That Has Nourished, Healed, and Inspired Through the Ages. It was a hawthorn tree that got me into perennials and wild foods in the first place. My name (Hagens) means, in German, “hawthorn hedge.” The haws, in German, are called “hags” and the healing witch in the olden days got her name from this heart-nourishing tree. I love the jelly recipe. Will add lemon next time I make it. Happy holiday.

    • Wonderful to hear your story Bethe! And Bill’s book I had seen in my local bookstore. I just bought it, so thanks for making my library more extensive than it was before 🙂 Happy holidays to you too.

  8. PS I forgot to say that here in Maine (northeast coast of USA), the haws literally drop off the tree unbruised and sweet on the day that they taste best. If I pick them, they are less so. We used to be able to go out and gather them predictably on October 15. This year, they were still on the tree late in November.

  9. I pour my Haw Jelly into ice cube trays and set it in the fridge. Just pop a cube out for an after dinner treat and to calm the heart before bed.
    Thanks again Robin. Stella

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