Edible Burdock Root Recipe

Burdock (Arctium) root is a tasty addition to a stir fry. You can use either Greater Burdock (Arctium lappa) or Lesser Burdock (Arctium minus).

IMPORTANT: When harvesting burdock root, make sure that you gather it only from first year burdock. Second year burdock is past its edibility prime and is not recommended as a food stuff.

Also make sure when collecting Burdock that you harvest from an area that is flush with the plant. Never completely harvest the whole patch, always leave some plants to continue to grow. Remember this isn’t strip-mining it’s sustainable food gathering.

Step 1

First off, find a nice patch of burdock. Read more…

Himalayan Balsam Seed Curry Recipe

Himalayan Balsam (Impatiens glandulifera) has been eaten in India for hundreds of years. I first came across the reference in Sir George Watt’s six volume ‘A Dictionary of Economic Products of India’ 1889-1896. In it he mentions that the seeds are eaten, having a nutty flavour, while the young leaves where used as a vegetable.

In this recipe, my friend Chris Holland from Wholeland, is going to be showing you how to make a spontaneous Himalyan Balsam seed curry using leftovers in his kitchen.

This recipe serves 2 adults and 1 nine year old child. Read more…

Blackberry Vinegar Recipe

Blackberry (Rubus fruticosus) vinegar is fantastic added to salad dressings. It can also be used as a thirst quencher on a hot day, and is excellent as a hot drink when you have a cold or the flu.

When you notice a cold looming, take 1 tablespoon of blackberry vinegar in a cup of hot water, or drink 2-3 cups a day if your cold is full-blown.

Step 1

Pick 1lb of blackberries. Remove the stalks, use only the berries.Read more…

How to Dry & Store Rose Hips for Rose Hip Tea

Rose Hip Tea (Rosa canina) is so refreshing and packed with vitamins and minerals. A great hot Winter time drink. Delicately sweet, this is one of my favourites, and I consume it daily throughout the Dark Months.

For rose hip tea, simply put 1-2 teaspoons of dried rose hips in a tea pot, let it sit for 15-20 minutes, then strain into a cup. Drink at will.

Step 1

Pick as many rose hips as you think you need to last you until next year. I also wash them first.

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Wild Food Safety Guidelines If You Want To Eat Edible Wild Plants

wild-food-safety

Today I’m going to be covering wild food safety and a simple “Tolerance Test” to make sure that your body doesn’t react adversely after you eat wild food plants. As my old mentor used to say: “Assume Nothing, Test Everything”. Even though you might have identified a plant with 150% certainty, until you eat a small sample of it, you do not know how your body will react.

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