Pickled Magnolia Flowers Recipe

This Pickled Magnolia flowers recipe is quite simply, exquisite. I have used Magnolia soulangeana, and Magnolia grandiflora.

The texture and taste is nothing more than Love Food. Every person that has tasted this recipe (and that’s quite a few), remark how amazing the Magnolia flowers are.

Although the end result looks like pickled oysters in malt vinegar, the flavour will convert you as soon as it hits your taste buds.

magnolia-flowers-recipe-2

Pickled Magnolia Flowers Recipe Ingredients

  • 1 lb fresh young edible magnolia flowers that have been separated.
  • 1 1/2 cups rice vinegar
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp salt

Pickled Magnolia Flowers Recipe Instructions

Wash and dry the Magnolia flowers with paper towels and put them in a sterilised jar along with the salt.

Mix the rice vinegar and sugar in a pan and bring to a boil. Pour the hot mixture of vinegar and sugar over the Magnolia flowers, allow to cool, then screw a cap on the jar.

Eat the Pickled Magnolia Flowers either when cold or as an accompaniment with salads.

Makes about 1 cup

 

My Latest Print Book is Now Available on Amazon

For over fifteen years I have experimented and explored the world of wild plants. Uncovering how our ancestors used plants to nourish and heal themselves.

I’ve spent thousands of hours digging through scientific papers, read hundreds of books. Even gone so far as to be nomadic for over a year. During this time I followed the seasons and plants around the highways and byways of these isles.

I have written this book to help you rediscover our forgotten plant heritage. To learn how to use wild plants as food and medicine. Knowledge that was once common to everyone. Click here to learn more.

Share your experience. Leave a note for others

  1. Thanks so much! I’m also curious, for sealed and opened, how you store them and how long they last. I tried a little nibble and they are delicious already!

    Reply
  2. Um, they usually don’t last long in my household as they end up in my tummy rather quickly 🙂 That being said I did leave some, one year, for a good 6 months and they were fine. I kept them in a sealed Kilner jar.

    Reply

Leave a comment