Primrose Activity Book

Subscribe to my newsletter to get updated when new articles are released.

 

My Latest Book is Now Available on Amazon as a Paperback or Kindle

For over fifteen years I have experimented and explored the world of wild plants. Uncovering how our ancestors used plants to nourish and heal themselves.

I鈥檝e spent thousands of hours digging through scientific papers, read hundreds of books. Even gone so far as to be nomadic for over a year. During this time I followed the seasons and plants around the highways and byways of these isles.

I have written this book to help you rediscover our forgotten plant heritage. To learn how to use wild plants as food and medicine. Knowledge that was once common to everyone. Click here to learn more.

Share your experience. Leave a note for others

  1. Hi Robin, you asked for feedback on your draft of the activity books. My comments here apply to both Primrose & Dandelion. I have 4 children aged 2 to 11 so feel qualified to comment 馃檪
    Firstly I think it’s a great idea.
    I also love the illustration and the opportunity to colour in (smaller kids love that and if you have a mix of ages it keeps them busy whilst older ones can do the research).
    I would like a few more questions maybe. Or another task at the end like a simple word search of relevant words.
    Also I understand it may not be possible for someone to have the plant in front of them but as an activity book you could use on a walk it would be great to have an in practice section. For example a simple recipe in the sheet so kids could actually use leaves in a salad. I know my kids love picking wild garlic leaves then making soup. Or maybe making a rubber band from dandelion sap (I read that it’s possible but haven’t done it!).
    I also love the section on other names which is both fun and a good memory aid.
    Hope that is useful to you & keep up the great work ?

    Reply
  2. I’d agree with the above, loved the illustrations. would like to have something on value to pollinators like a pic of yellow beeswax and pollen. You could offer making new words out of the name, dandelion flower salad, crystallised primrose petals, something on what wishes they’d create from blowing clocks of seeds, a mention on the coffee substitute also (best with autumn roots as sweeter)maybe a warning not to feed too many leaves to rabbits and gps because of it being a diuretic

    Reply
  3. Hi Robin,

    Love the presentation..really took me back to my childhood!
    A good easy start and way in and like courtney would like to see a few more things to do and even if the plant is not near (and it is pretty easy one to find in gardens etc) get them to interact a little more through some sort of sensory connection
    I wander if it is worth prompting families to get to know the plant more by smelling and touching with respect and prompting them to say words that come to mind that they may put next to the drawing. Possibly worth putting in some simple ways of writing about a plant eg haiku, kenning.
    Thanks as ever for all you do for the world.

    Reply
  4. I agree with all the above. I have grandchildren and work on a children’s ward, it’s a lovely way to introduce children and their families to the richness around them. Thank you

    Reply
  5. I on’t have kids but plenty of nieces and nephews. An excellent idea and format which I’m sure will get them hooked.

    Wish these had been around when I was a kid as it would have sparked a life-long interest instead of the later in life-long interest your site has sparked:-)

    Reply

Leave a comment