Three Cornered Leek Hummus

It’s the end of January and I head out to forage, unfortunately or fortunately depending on how you look at it, I don’t need to step any further than my garden.

Not because I have some lush cultivated veggies to harvest, but because my garden is putting forth a ubiquitous wild edible plant known as Three Cornered Leek (Allium triquetrum), or as some wild flower ID books call it Three Cornered Garlic.

An migrant plant to these shores and yet another that get’s attacked for daring to chance its luck on Blighty!

I’ve used the common names interchangeably for years, but now decide to call it by what I think it tastes like, which is similar to mini leeks. In the Mediterranean this particular species is called wild leeks, though not to be confused with the real wild leek Allium ampeloprasum, which as Alan Davidson’s Oxford Companion to Food states is ancestor of Allium porum, the cultivated leek of Europe and national emblem of Wales.

Having just returned from holiday, I opened the cupboard to find, well to be honest not a lot. I tend not to hoard food stuffs, instead eating what appears on my land base and purchasing shop products as and when required to accompany my wild foraged finds.

Today I have some tahini left over, and a single tin of chickpeas, plus some lemons I bought a day ago as I felt I needed a vitamin C boost, and some scruffy looking garlic that I eat literally by the bulb-full. Yup single cloves are for wimps!

So seeing the garden being taken over by aforementioned plant, I decided to whip up this quick Three Cornered Leek Hummus recipe.

Ingredients

  • 400g tin of chickpeas
  • 200g three cornered leek (chopped)
  • 6 tbsp of tahini (I use Al Nakhil from Lebanon as it doesn’t have the bitterness most Greek/Cypress tahini brands do)
  • 3 tbsp of lemon juice
  • 6 tbsp water
  • 3 garlic cloves (chopped)
  • 2 pinches of salt

Suggested Instructions

  1. Put chickpeas in blender, and pulse for a few seconds.
  2. Next add all the other ingredients and blend until of the consistency you desire. Some folk like it chunky, others smooth, the choice is yours.

Makes: 450g

My Latest Print Book is Now Available on Amazon

For over fifteen years I have experimented and explored the world of wild plants. Uncovering how our ancestors used plants to nourish and heal themselves.

I’ve spent thousands of hours digging through scientific papers, read hundreds of books. Even gone so far as to be nomadic for over a year. During this time I followed the seasons and plants around the highways and byways of these isles.

I have written this book to help you rediscover our forgotten plant heritage. To learn how to use wild plants as food and medicine. Knowledge that was once common to everyone. Click here to learn more.

Share your experience. Leave a note for others

  1. I use allium triquetrum to replace the spinach, garlic, and/or onion in spanikopita, spinach & ricotta cannelloni, gnudi, quiche, and gozleme, and to replace chives and/or spring onions in just about everything. It also goes in our version of Ottolenghi’s Israeli salad. We love it, and my mum, who gets tummy issues from onion or garlic if they’re not slowly and thoroughly cooked in oil (caramelised, really), seems to be able to eat allium triquetrum any way it comes, and in large quantities. I don’t forage, because our council sprays (as do most of the locals), but i gathered plants of this from a creekbank a couple of years ago to plant in our own garden, where i keep it fairly tame by picking all the seedheads. I haven’t tried replacing leeks with it yet – thanks for the thought!

    Reply

Leave a comment