What to Forage in July – The Best Wild Food Plants To Gather

Discover over seventy wild food plants you can forage and wildcraft in July.

Availability should only be seen as a rough guide. Variations in climate and location will make a difference to what’s available.

Annual Seablite (Suaeda maritima)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.
Stalk: Young, raw, cooked.

Ash (Fraxinus excelsior)
Leaf: Tea, leaf curd.

Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus)
Fruit: Raw, cooked.

Bog Myrtle (Myrica gale)
Leaf: Fresh or dried. Flavouring. Tea.
Fruit: Fresh or dried. Flavouring.

Bramble or Blackberry (Rubus spp.)
Leaf: Tea
Fruit: Raw, cooked.

Brooklime (Veronica beccabunga)
Leaf: Cooked.

Bulrush or Cattail (Typha latifolia)
Stem: Raw, cooked.
Flower: Spike is steamed or cooked.
Seed: Raw, roasted.
Root: Raw, flour.

Chickweed (Stellaria media)
Leaf: Raw.
Stem: Raw.
Seed: Cooked.

Cleavers (Galium aparine)
Leaf: Cooked, tea, leaf curd.
Seed: Roasted, sprouted.

Common Bistort (Bistorta officinalis)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.

Common Mallow (Malva sylvestris)
Leaf: Cooked.
Flower: Raw.

Common Orache (Atriplex patula)
Leaf: Cooked.

Common Poppy (Papaver rhoeas)
Flower: Raw.

Common Reed (Phragmites australis)
Leaf: Unfolded, dry, grind.
Root: Cooked, flour.

Common Scurvygrass (Cochlearia officinalis)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.

Common Sorrel (Rumex acetosa)
Leaf: Raw, cooked, juice used as rennet.
Flower: Cooked.
Seed: Dried, flour.
Root: Cooked. Dried, flour.

Couchgrass (Elymus repens)
Leaf: Leaf curd.
Root: Cooked. Dried for flour. Roasted as a coffee substitute.

Curley Dock (Rumex crispus)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.
Seed: Raw, roasted, flour.

Daisy (Bellis perennis)
Flower: Raw.

Dandelion (Taraxacum spp.)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.
Flower: Raw, cooked.
Seed: Raw, roasted.
Root: First year roots raw, cooked, roasted.

Darwin’s Barberry (Berberis darwinii)
Fruit: Raw, cooked.

Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii)
Shoots: Raw, cooked.

Downy Birch (Betula pubescens)
Leaf: Tea, leaf curd.

Dwarf Mallow (Malva neglecta)
Leaf: Cooked.
Flower: Raw.

Elder (Sambucus nigra)
Flower: Raw, cooked.

Fat Hen or Lambsquarters (Chenopodium album)
Leaf: Cooked.

Ground Elder (Aegopodium podagraria)
Leaf: Cooked.

Hairy Bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.
Flower: Raw.

Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna)
Leaf: Tea, leaf curd.

Hedge Mustard (Sisymbrium officinale)
Leaf: Cooked.

Hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium)
Seed: Dried, spice.

Hop (Humulus lupulus)
Shoots: Cooked.
Rhizomes: Cooked

Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana)
Leaf: Young, raw, cooked.

Japanese Rose (Rosa rugosa)
Flower: Raw, dried, tea, cooked.

Lesser Burdock (Arctium minus)
Stem: Inner pith eaten raw or cooked.
Root: Raw, cooked.

Lime or Linden (Tilia spp.)
Flowers: Raw, dried. Tea.

Marsh Samphire or Glasswort (Salicornia europaea)
Stem: Raw, cooked.

Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria)
Leaf: Young, cooked. Tea.
Flower: Cooked.
Root: Young, cooked.

Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris)
Leaf: Cooked. Tea.

Navelwort (Umbilicus rupestris)
Leaf: Raw.

Nipplewort (Lapsana communis)
Leaf: Cooked.

Oregon Grape (Mahonia aquifolium)
Fruit: Raw, cooked.

Oxeye Daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.
Flower: Raw, candied.

Pignut (Conopodium majus)
Root: Raw.

Pineappleweed (Matricaria discoidea)
Flowers/buds: Raw.

Purple Dew Plant (Disphyma crassifolium)
Leaf: Raw.

Raspberry (Rubus idaeus)
Leaf: Tea.

Red Clover (Trifolium pratense)
Leaf: Young, raw, cooked.
Flower: Young, raw.
Seed: Raw, sprouted, cooked.

Red Deadnettle (Lamium purpureum)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.
Stem: Raw, cooked.

Ribwort Plantain (Plantago lanceolata)
Leaf: Cooked.
Buds: Raw, cooked.
Root: Cooked.

Rock Samphire (Crithmum maritimum)
Leaf: Tips raw, cooked.
Stalk: Raw, cooked.

Rosebay Willowherb (Epilobium angustifolium)
Leaf: Young, raw, cooked. Fermented, tea.
Stalk: Young, peeled, raw, cooked.
Flower: Raw.
Root: Raw. Dried, beverage, flour.

Sea Sandwort (Honckenya peploides)
Leaf: Cooked.

Sea Arrowgrass (Triglochin maritima)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.
Stalk: Raw, cooked.
Stem: Raw, cooked.

Sea Beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.

Sea Kale (Crambe maritima)
Leaf: Young, raw. Older, cooked.
Seedpod: Young, raw. Mature, cooked.

Sea Purslane (Atriplex portulacoides)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.

Sea Rocket (Cakile maritima)
Leaf: Young, raw. Mature, cooked.
Buds: Raw, cooked.
Flower: Raw, cooked.
Stem: Raw, cooked.
Seedpod: Young, raw, cooked.
Root: Dried, flour.

Shepherd’s Purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.

Silverweed (Potentilla anserina)
Leaf: Raw, tea.
Shoots: Young, raw.
Root: Cooked.

Spear Leaved Orache (Atriplex prostrata)
Leaf: Cooked.

Spruce (Picea spp.)
Leaf: Tea.

Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica)
Seed: Dried, raw.

Stonecrop (Sedum spp.)
Leaf: Raw.

Sweet Cicely (Myrrhis odorata)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.
Seedpod: Raw.

Sweet Vernal Grass (Anthoxanthum odoratum)
Leaf: Fresh, dry. Flavouring.
Warning: Make sure it is free of ergot fungus.

Tree Mallow (Lavatera arborea)
Leaf: Cooked.
Flower: Raw.

Walnut (Juglans regia)
Seed: Raw, pickled.

Watercress (Nasturtium officinale)
Leaf: Cooked.
Stem: Cooked.

Water Mint (Mentha aquatica)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.

Wild Carrot (Daucus carota)
Flowers: Raw, cooked.
Seed: Seasoning.

Wild Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.

Wild Garlic or Ramsons (Allium ursinum)
Leaf: Cooked
Flower: Raw.
Seed: Raw.
Root: Raw.

Wild Marjoram (Origanum vulgare)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.

Wild Onion (Allium vineale)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.
Bulbils/flowers: Raw, cooked.

Wood Sorrel (Oxalis acetosella)
Leaf: Raw.
Flower: Raw.

Wild Strawberry (Fragaria vesca)
Leaf: Tea.
Fruit: Raw.

Wild Thyme (Thymus polytrichus)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)
Leaf: Raw, cooked.

Further Reading

Share Your Experience. Leave A Note For Others

  1. Wow! That’s a LOT – and how nice my mum taught me to identify a lot of them as a child! I shall be scouring my 10 acres to see what grows there already, and be checking them out next year when I live there! Moving house it taking all my time at present! Thank you fir all the hard work! ?

    Reply
  2. Fantastic as always. Some I am aware of from my mum telling me others are new to me. Can’t wait to look and gather some. Thank you as always ?

    Reply
  3. Thanks Robin what a great list, when the rain stops I’ll be out looking again in the surrounding fields and hills.

    Reply
  4. Thank you for such a comprehensive list for July. I have written out the list and done a drawing next to each of the herbs I am ensure of to help me to identify while foraging.

    Reply
  5. Thank you, a wonderful list of plants I’m already planning a more in depth forage with this as a guide. The Elder trees are still flowering in my village, current plans have been to make an Elderflower cordial this weekend- will hopefully be able to expand that now

    Reply
  6. Thank you for this extensive list Robin. It is very appreciated by many, i feel sure. Fascinated by the plants i haver heard of and keen to get out and scour the landscape for them

    Reply
  7. Excellent list thank you Robin: Lots of variety and valuable pointers. Yes, you do need to study several key identification features to be sure of not making a horrific mistake. And also beware of accidentally gathering poisonous neighbours (plants, that is – can’t help with human variety).

    Reply

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